Posted by: laurawp | October 16, 2014

Trish Johnson & San Francisco’s Coit Tower

Coit Tower, a San Francisco icon!

Coit Tower, a San Francisco icon!

When Trish Johnson comes to town… we try and get together in San Francisco! This time we visited Coit Tower… a wonderful little spot in North Beach.

Mural of downtown San Francisco, circa 1930.

Mural of downtown San Francisco, circa 1930.

The murals inside Coit tower are the result of several artists paid by the government during the depression. it was good to get paid to paint, eh! notice the gentleman getting robbed on the right.

Coit Tower mural; Oarkland ferry

Coit Tower mural; Oarkland ferry

The murals depict a moment in time; the 1930’s. Trish and I decide to pay the money to ride the elevator to the top of Coit Tower… and the viewing deck. The line begins around the corner.

Trish merges with the murals of Coit Tower

Trish merges with the murals of Coit Tower

Trish and I love the murals of the agriculture in California; the apricots and vineyards and wine!

Coit Tower murals of the area

Coit Tower murals of the area

In the last stage of waiting for the elevator, we are in a round room with small murals of the surrounding area. Here we seem to be looking from the hill that Coit tower resides.

Close-up of Coit Tower Mural from the hill

Close-up of Coit Tower Mural from the hill

Here is a self portrait of the artist, I imagine, with a friend. it’s so fun to be looking over their shoulders.

Coit Tower view of the Bay Bridge and the Transamerica Building.

Coit Tower view of the Bay Bridge and the Transamerica Building.

Once on top, the openings are secured with windows. Young people are there to help; they open a few of the windows, so we tourists can lean out and take a few photos. unfortunately, it’s quite hazy on the day of our visit… oh well.

Coit Tower view towards Van Ness and the Golden Gate bridge.

Coit Tower view towards Van Ness and the Golden Gate bridge.

one of the young people, a handsome young man, points out Lombard Street… the twisting and popular street that tourists drive down.

Coit Tower view of the ships in the harbor and Mt Tamalpais in the backround

Coit Tower view of the ships in the harbor and Mt Tamalpais in the background

We move around the top viewing windows and take in the 360 degree view!

Sky out the top of Coit Tower.

Sky out the top of Coit Tower.

Finally, there is only one view left… up!

Coit Tower round window view

Coit Tower round window view

Half way down the stairs back to the elevator, is this lovely view out of a port window.

Coit Tower mural of the industrialization

Coit Tower mural of the industrialization

Back down on the first floor, Trish and I enjoy the murals again. The tourist shop is part of the murals.

Coit tower mural of the Chronicle, a San Francisco newspaper still published.

Coit tower mural of the Chronicle, a San Francisco newspaper still published.

The headlines proclaim the murals in Coit Tower finished!

Coit Tower murals depicting the newspaper office on the one wall and the readers on the other wall.

Coit Tower murals depicting the newspaper office on the one wall and the readers on the other wall.

So many people, you feel like you’re there… in 1930!

Coit Tower mural of the California Cowboy

Coit Tower mural of the California Cowboy

The Cowboy stands about 15 feet tall… very impressive!

Coit Tower mural of the women harvesting the flowers.

Coit Tower mural of the women harvesting the flowers.

This was one of Trish’s favourite part of the murals; the flower harvest!
Coit Tower is a must see in San Francisco! usually you can park at the top of the hill; take a chance and drive up!

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Responses

  1. It’s more fun to walk up though!!! I love the murals! They tell so many stories.

  2. Reblogged this on Crooked House Rugs and commented:
    Laura Pierce shares a visit with Trish Johnson to the Coit Tower in San Francisco. Fabulous murals and one particularly nice view, even on a hazy day, out a circular window. It would make an interesting hooked rug. So would many parts of the murals, painted during the Depression by artists paid by government grants, surely one of the nicer stories from that grey and desperate time. So great that they’ve been appreciated and maintained all these years!


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